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FIVE THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT EDUCATION IN MALI

Despite relative improvements in past decades, such as the recognition of education as a constitutional right in Mali in 1993, the implementation of the Malian government’s Ten-Year Education Development Program (PRODEC), and increasing donations from the United States, France and the World Bank, socioeconomic barriers still limit access to education in Mali. Here are five facts about the Malian education system which highlight some of these barriers and some potential solutions.

  1. In Mali, the first six years of schooling are primary education, and the last six years are separated into two three-year cycles of secondary education. Education in Mali is free and compulsory between ages 7 and 16, or until the end of grade nine. Even so, many children still do not attend class due to high ancillary education costs, including transportation, writing supplies and uniforms.
  2. In order to pursue the second level of secondary education, students sit for an exam called the Diplôme d’études fondamentales at the end of grade nine. Secondary schools are mostly located in urban areas and many are private institutions, so accessibility is limited for poor children in rural areas.One organization working to improve school attendance in Mali is the Ouelessebougou Alliance, a developmental partnership with villagers in the Ouelessebougou region of Mali. The Alliance has constructed 18 new concrete classrooms and provides pencils, paper, chalkboards, chalk, erasers, maps, some textbooks, and bench desks for 11 village elementary schools. The Alliance has a five-year plan for school construction with the goal that villages can become eligible to have their education programs sustained by the government of Mali. Over the past year alone, its efforts have allowed over 1,900 children attend village schools.
  3. According to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics, 69 percent of Mali children of primary school age are enrolled in primary school and 36 percent of secondary school-aged students are enrolled in secondary school. These statistics correlate with the economic and accessibility barriers keeping many students from obtaining a higher secondary education.
  4. At the end of grade 12, students sit for an exam called the Baccalauréat, which is required to pass in order to graduate. From there, students may attend an institute of tertiary education, like the University of Bamako, to study science and technology, medicine, humanities, arts and science, law and public service or economy and management. Over the past few decades, however, the Malian government and the World Bank have promoted vocational training and apprenticeships as more accessible career avenues.
  5. Malian girls have a greater risk of early school dropout, seeing as they are expected to marry young. According to UNICEF, while 62 percent of all Malian children who enter primary schooling eventually finish their last year of primary school, 64 percent of boys and only 59 percent of girls complete their basic education.

In a study of the scientific, technical, and vocational education of African girls, UNESCO found that on average women made up 23 percent of college graduates in the medical field, three percent of engineering graduates, and 10 percent of graduates in agricultural sciences. Tertiary education in Mali may be inaccessible to many students, but it is especially unobtainable to Malian girls. In response to these findings, UNESCO office in Bamako and the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) have taken measures to fund a UNESCO-UNFPA-UNWOMEN joint project. The initiative aims to increase access to quality education for adolescent girls and young women, provide protective gender-sensitive learning environments adapted to strengthened links between education and health, and social services for adolescent girls and young women.

Although education in Mali has seen some improvement in recent years, reassessment of the barriers which impede young students as well as expanding efforts to help them is crucial for continued development.

Source : ( MaliEdulabs finds it important  )

Casie Wilson

What can be the Solution ?

Although education in Mali has improved over the past decade, more than 2 million children aged 5 to 17 are still not in school and more than half of Mali’s 15 to 24-year-olds are illiterate. Household poverty, child labour, child marriage, insecurity and the lack of schools close to children’s homes all contribute to Mali’s high dropout and non-enrolment rates. For children who do attend school, the lack of qualified teachers, textbooks and a quality school environment has a negative impact on learning outcomes: the vast majority of fifth-grade pupils in Mali still lack basic maths and reading skills.

There are inequities in access to and completion of schooling, as girls and children from the poorest families are most at risk of dropping out. Only 73.8 per cent of girls are enrolled in basic primary education compared to 85.8 per cent of boys. By the time they reach secondary school, the proportion of girls enrolled in school is only 15 per cent, compared to 21 per cent of boys.

MaliEdulabs is working on that with its partners, within this time, what do you think ?

EDUCATION IN MALI

 

Primary Education

There is an element of imbalance in Mali Education because the ministry of lower education is increasing throughput, whereas the ministry of secondary and higher education still does not have sufficient secondary schools. As a result, many secondary students are deprived of opportunities, and this still happens more frequently to girls than boys. Education is provided free of charge and legislated as compulsory between ages 7 and 16, of which the first 6 years are primary schooling. Despite improved facilities many poorer children still do not attend because of high ancillary education costs.

Middle Education

Students wishing to continue with their schooling must first pass the diplôme d’étude fondamentale on finishing primary school. Of those who succeeded in 2008, almost 21% were unable to obtain admission to middle school. Those who did, followed a standard academic curriculum for the next 3 years.

Secondary Education

Upper secondary schools are clustered in urban areas, and the best of these are privately administered. This sad reality of life ensures that the path to progress is largely obscured for those young people whose fathers are not either wealthy, or otherwise influential.

Vocational Education

The Mali government is addressing the secondary education bottleneck by expanding vocational training and introducing a national apprenticeship system. Practical skills like literacy and basic agricultural knowledge are also being provided. The country remains one of the poorest in the world, and of necessity, progress is slower than it might have otherwise been.

Tertiary Education

Mali Education

One of the world’s most ancient education institutions is Sankore Masjid which still operates in Timbuktu as a seat of Islamic learning. Its modern counterpart, the University of Bamako illustrated here, was founded in 1996 and is named after the capital city where it stands.

Its 5 faculties include science & technology, medical, humanities arts & science, law & public service, and economy & management. It also hosts an institute of management, and an institute of training and applied research. The medium of education is French.

ROAD CLEANING INITIATIVE : the youth of Timbuktu in action!

On this Sunday, September 23rd, 2018, the youth of Abaradjou has proceeded to a road cleaning . The tare of the Abaradjou neighborhood was constructed on 2007 by the mayor Said Mahamoud . That area is far located behind the city , for this reason it’s neglected and now covered by sand dunes . In Timbuktu, infrastructures are built but are not maintained , most often abandoned after inauguration and are not made of good use .

Despite the presence of local authorities, NGOs, the youth is compelled to be active and react against difficulties faced in their neighborhoods .

This morning we have collected some donations of money to help workers cleaning the road . We served them breakfast and lunch . The job was properly done in the satisfaction of the inhabitants of Abaradjou neighborhood.

MY STORY OF LEARNING ENGLISH

It’s a long story to tell you my experience of learning English. I began to meet English alphabets in grade 7 not like today’s children who have already been learning English since Kindergarten or at least in grade 3. I got a crush on this foreign language at once .

As an old saying goes:” interest is the best teacher ” when I was student ( from primary school to University), I consciously recited vocabulary, learned grammar , made sentences , wrote passage and read books as much as I could . Of course, I also had some upset time while learning those materials which were not my type like phonetics and Bilingualism… what did I do if I did not like them ? Easy ! I never forced myself to accept anything I hate. So , I put them down and went to do something interesting , like listening to music , watching movies or chatting with foreign friends. In progress I had already changed my point of view and thinking process. When I looked back what I hated, they were not snorty anymore , then I could get them done with a relaxing mood. Some of my friend find it to forget vocabulary they learnt the other day. So do I! You never remember it without using it frequently. Thus , better consult a dictionary when you meet new words and see other meaning and usage. Then make your own sentences from time to time . Another way to take new words in mind is reading passage .There will be some explanations behind the passage and you can easily remember new words through context.

For me, reading contributed a lot to my learning skills of other aspects. Imagine if you are reading , you will meet new words, learn grammar , think in an English way and write in similar pattern. So , I strongly recommend learning from reading ! When reading in English, you are not only reading English words but also getting message from it .Just like you are reading a French newspaper, you can get a lot of information out of it, but now you are changing your reading way in English.

Listening and dictation were my weaknesses. I was finding flexible way to improve them. I had trying English song and movies , audios and video files. And I know practice and patience are the key to success. Maybe my mind jumps too fast ? Why are they still my weaknesses?

To achieve my goal, I turned to some of my teachers who oriented me to practical websites. I used to borrow some English books from my college library. But the type of books depends on my necessity in each stage . For leisure I read novels , poems and magazines with French-Englsh version in them. From both version I can compare their translation and enjoy the beauty in two languages.

Regarding the oral practice, I am lucky to know some many foreign friends and teachers around the world. They are always nice to talk with me on Facebook and whatsapp. However, speaking is far more difficult for me than writing. I can write fast and logically but I make mistakes in speaking now and then , I realize my mistakes right after I finish my utterance. What a shame ! Anyway I still have chance to talk and can correct the mistakes next time. I console myself and I am making great efforts to be a senior INTERPRETER . If you want to communicate freely with foreigners, don’t be shy to practise with anyone who knows English. Here is an interesting thing of mine :

” I teach English and my students are from Bangladesh and Mali. Young or old, we use English as our communication tool. Provided I teach them French characters and culture , I would prepare my session in English explanation and some of them speak Bengali ,some speak French. Under such circumstances, our classroom is filled with four languages. They learn from me while I learn from them “.

THE MALIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM

The ” salamanedulabs ” acts on school concerns across the country. Basically, it’s further divided into two administrative bodies such as “Ministry of basic education, literacy and national languages ” and ” Ministry of secondary and superior education and scientific research ” .

Education framework is characterized by 6 years primary education, 6 year secondary education equally divided into two three-year levels and 4 year tertiary education. Mandatory education is only 9 years. Before a student can advance to secondary studies , a qualifying exam must be successfully passed to secure Fundamental studies Diploma for high school admission. Most of basic and secondary schools are maintained by the government hence no tuition fee is required. Higher education schools are but limited in number such as Bamanko, Academia hispan aires,Université du Mali and institut d’Economie rurale du Mali.

In 2003, the state allocates 15% of national expenditure to educational funding. Resulting pupil-teacher ratio implies that one teacher is assigned to handle 54 students . Geographical aptitude results made it to 75%. The literacy rate is 46% of the entire populace. In particular Malian men have higher literacy rate with 54% compared to women with only 40% as female enrollment share in secondary school is only 34% . As the adult population literacy rate reached 60%.

THE MALIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM

The ” salamanedulabs ” acts on school concerns across the country. Basically, it’s further divided into two administrative bodies such as “Ministry of basic education, literacy and national languages ” and ” Ministry of secondary and superior education and scientific research ” .

Education framework is characterized by 6 years primary education, 6 year secondary education equally divided into two three-year levels and 4 year tertiary education. Mandatory education is only 9 years. Before a student can advance to secondary studies , a qualifying exam must be successfully passed to secure Fundamental studies Diploma for high school admission. Most of basic and secondary schools are maintained by the government hence no tuition fee is required. Higher education schools are but limited in number such as Bamanko, Academia hispan aires,Université du Mali and institut d’Economie rurale du Mali.

In 2003, the state allocates 15% of national expenditure to educational funding. Resulting pupil-teacher ratio implies that one teacher is assigned to handle 54 students . Geographical aptitude results made it to 75%. The literacy rate is 46% of the entire populace. In particular Malian men have higher literacy rate with 54% compared to women with only 40% as female enrollment share in secondary school is only 34% . As the adult population literacy rate reached 60%.

La jeunesse Malienne face à la deperdition scolaire

L’interet de ce theme est de faire un diagnostic sur les causes de la deperdition scolaire , sensibiliser Les eleves et etudiants, l’executif et Les parents pour qu’ils prennent conscience de leur part de responsabilité dans cette crise scolaire .

L’ecole qui jadis etait in milieu paisible où est dispensé un enseignement libre de qualité. Nous assistons aujourdhui à une perte progressive du niveau d’alphabetisation d’une jeunesse en pleine croissance.

QUELLES SONT LES CAUSES DE CETTE DEPERDITION SCOLAIRE ?

en effet, la deperdition scolaire est due à des causes qui sont à la fois multiples et variées et sont d’ordre socioeconmique et politique .

A- LES CAUSES SOCIALES

cette jeunesse qui constitue l’avenir du pays, considerée comme le futur batisseur de demain se regroupe formant des grins, des clans et se jette au snobisme. Une jeunesse qui s’interesse plus à l’argent, à la jeune fille et aux boites de nuit que la formation et les etudes. Elle sera alors rongée par le tabagisme , l’alcolisme , la drogue et le banditisme.

B- LES CAUSES ECONOMIQUES

La pauvreté , le manque de moyen des parents font que beaucoup des jeunes vivent dans des conditions miserables à cela s’ajoute la chereté de l’ecole, l’inaccessibilité à la documentation comme le cas de beaucoup d’eleves du nord du pays.

C- LES CAUSES POLITIQUES

L’ecole a tant été politisée, les politiques se servent de leaders de l’education pour arriver à des fins propres . Aussi , avec l’instauration de l’AEEM, nous assistons à des guerres de gangs , des violences de corps. La mort du jeune Papou dans la salle de l’ENA en 2005 en est un exemple .

Au regard de tout ce qui precede, on peut donc conclure que les jeunes constituent les causes de tous les problemes auxquels ils sont confrontés. Ils doivent se reorganiser en Association de lutte contre eux memes pour s’epanouir intellectuellement afin de pouvoir participer au developpement de leur pays.

“CTIF MALI ” A social Business concept to promote entrepreneurship

Motivated by the satisfaction of helping the local population of the mysterious city of Timbuktu using English , in another hand the promotion of the English language itself, I have established CTIF MALI ( cabinet de Traduction d’interpretariat et de formations) on March 2017 . CTIF Mali is a national agency specialized in languages , consultancy and delivery of services .

The most urgent objectives of CTIF Mali are :

1- provide translation , interpretation and training services

2- sensitize and train the communities of the mysterious city of Timbuktu and impact on their economy

3- promote English, our national languages , our social and cultural values

4- promote youth entrepreneurship by creating and finding some opportunities and initiatives to youth.

As result , CTIF Mali has brought a great change of behavior , mentality and made the communication easier between local authorities and their technical and financial partners, National NGOs and their partners and for the inhabitants with whom we feel proud to work collaboratively .